Site Loader

Did you know that a business can be diverse without being inclusive? It’s true! In this lesson, we’ll talk more about what inclusion means, why it’s important, and what it might look like in a growing organization.

Diversity vs Inclusion

As the owner of a large business in his hometown, Ted has worked doubly hard to build a diverse workforce that represents people from all walks of life.

Best services for writing your paper according to Trustpilot

Premium Partner
From $18.00 per page
4,8 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,80
Delivery
4,90
Support
4,70
Price
Recommended Service
From $13.90 per page
4,6 / 5
4,70
Writers Experience
4,70
Delivery
4,60
Support
4,60
Price
From $20.00 per page
4,5 / 5
4,80
Writers Experience
4,50
Delivery
4,40
Support
4,10
Price
* All Partners were chosen among 50+ writing services by our Customer Satisfaction Team

Employees of different races, ethnicities, genders, ages and religion make up his 100-person team because he knows that diversity means good things for customer satisfaction, decision making, reaching goals, and growing his business.The only problem is, Ted’s business isn’t inclusive. What? How’s that? How can a business be diverse, but not inclusive? Let’s take a closer look.

What Does Inclusion Mean?

There’s a lot of chatter today about diversity in the workforce, and that’s a good thing. Diversity, according to the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM), means ”the collective mixture of differences and similarities that includes, for example, individual and organizational characteristics, values, beliefs, experiences, backgrounds, preferences and behaviors.”So, Ted’s workforce that includes women, different races, a mixture of older and younger employees, and people with different levels of education or skill sets is a good example of diversity at work.

It means that Ted’s workplace environment should boast diverse perspectives, thoughts, and ideas that help the business succeed.Except, that’s not what’s really happening.Even though Ted is embracing the idea of diversity, he’s failing at inclusion. Inclusion, the SHRM says, is ”the achievement of a work environment in which all individuals are treated fairly and respectfully, have equal access to opportunities and resources, and can contribute fully to the organization’s success.”Inclusion means that a diverse pool of employees are respected and valued, allowing them to reach their full potential while contributing to the success of the business as a whole. So, if diversity is represented as various puzzle pieces, inclusion represents what the puzzle looks like when everything is pieced together.

In short, you can work in a diverse environment without working in an inclusive one.

Importance of Inclusion

Becoming an inclusive workplace is important for a number of reasons. First, inclusion plugs the talent gap.

With entire generations retiring from the workforce, it’s critical that businesses find qualified and talented people to pick up the torch and help grow a business.Second, inclusion improves the decision-making process. Imagine having a room full of people with the same backgrounds, experiences, and ideas. There would be no one there to present a contrary viewpoint or draw from different life experiences to challenge people to think of things in a new way. People of different backgrounds help innovate and create solutions to problems.

Working with people of varying backgrounds gives everyone an opportunity to learn and grow.Third, inclusion prompts better relations. Employees who feel valued, and who work in a climate where others feel valued, are more likely to stay in their jobs longer than those who are dissatisfied. Some research has shown that inclusive practices also translate into better relations with customers as well.

Last, but certainly not least, inclusion leaves a positive mark on a business’ bottom line. Results from 2015’s Annual Global CEO Survey indicated that a majority of companies that focus on inclusivity saw improvements in their sales and growth.

Understanding Inclusion

So, what does inclusion in the workplace look like?Imagine that Ted’s business has grown so much that he needs to open a second and even a third warehouse. To focus more on inclusion, Ted can build his transition teams to include employees from different backgrounds, generations, genders, and races to help lead the expansion project.

Instead of relying on his usual ”inner circle,” Ted can reach out to employees at different levels and in different departments of the company to help guide the transition period. Comprising a team with different traits, characteristics, and life experiences can help encourage new ways of thinking and problem-solving as he expands his organization.

Lesson Summary

Okay, let’s recap what we’ve covered. Though important to one another, inclusion and diversity are two very different things.

Diversity means a collective mix of people with different traits, characteristics, and experiences, while inclusion is focused on giving all people fair and equal opportunities inside of a business. If you think of diversity and inclusion like a puzzle, diversity would be the different pieces, while inclusion would be the final product with all pieces working together. Inclusion is important for a number of reasons, including plugging the talent gap left by retirement, better learning and decision-making, enhanced employee relations, improved customer relations, and a better bottom line.

Post Author: admin

x

Hi!
I'm Eric!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out