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What’s not well known is the problems these individuals will face which include, but are not limited to, work/financial rubles, family support, and finally leaving what got you in trouble in the first place behind.

The term is “barriers to successful reentry” but should be called, “barriers to maybe reentry. ” It is not a guarantee that most individuals who are released from prison will remain that way. In fact the sad truth is most people end up going back multiple times. All of this is due to the barriers/ struggles fresh released inmates face that force them back to what got them there in the first place.It is important to recognize and acknowledge this from a criminal justice aspect because like us prisoners are human beings, only preference is they are someone who made a mistake and was caught. Mistakes are a human trait you must remember. Due to that fact alone we should not set aside someone based on their past, but rather look to successfully reenter them so they can be an asset to society instead of a liability.

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Don’t get that mixed up with all prisoners. If they aren’t being released back into society there is probably a good reason why.The biggest barrier that all inmates will all face after being released from prison is the financial/work aspect. While they may have been deemed okay by the judicial system to get back into society and contribute, the biggest laity is that the majority will not be accepted due to their previous housing arrangements.

Imagine you had just served a 3. 5 year term for a crime committed when you were 20. The crime was none violent and while you were incarcerated completed many programs including getting a degree.

As this sounds promising while locked away, when you get released it essentially doesn’t mean squat.Money makes the world go around, and in order to get that you must have a job or some source of income. Unfortunately many companies across the United States are reluctant to hire a person who was locked up. As a prisoner in a movie clip stated, “Why hire us when they have 22 year olds who are fresh out Of college and have nothing but an underage drinking ticket to their name? ” This may seem biased and discriminating to the reentered person, but most states actually allow employers to deny jobs to those who have been arrested but not convicted of crimes.Also along those lines a company reserves the right to allow employers to deny jobs to anyone with a criminal record, regardless of how long ago the crime occurred, despite work history or personal circumstances. This leaves the newly released prisoner in quite the jam.

They need the money to pay for the hundreds (not exaggerated) of debts they acquired along the judicial process, but ironically they cannot pay those until they get the money to do so. This is where we see most prisoners return to prison because they simply didn’t have the means or financial stability to stay on the outside.Financial ability and work force hiring has been an ever going battle between officials. Some say it should be handled a certain way, while others lean towards a completely different path.

Each side believes they have the correct solution to fix this problem. One thing has been done and agreed by officials however, ND it involves setting up programs in prison that gives the prisoner a unique set of skills that will hopefully will increase their hiring stock. Not all prisoners struggle finding financial income after being released is an important thing to remember.

In a study conducted in Cleveland, Ohio they found that actually 37 percent of male prisoners in Cleveland federal prison were employed at a full-time job after release, with an additional 11 percent working part-time. Over a third of employed prisoners released in 2004 had jobs as manual laborers in the construction industry. They were also concentrated in the food revive, wholesale, maintenance and repair, and manufacturing sectors. Experts estimate the jobless rate for individuals with a prison record is from 40 percent to 60 percent.Based on these numbers they (Cleveland prisoners) are actually doing very well percentage wise.

While this may seem promising for other areas there is a major downside even the Cleveland prisoners couldn’t avoid. Many criminal justice practitioners suggest that the primary barrier is not employment availability, but rather keeping a job. Which leads to the next point. The problem has nothing to do with the company or risen, but rather the supply and demand for the goods. If there is no need for labor and the demand is down, who is likely to be fired or released by the business?The college graduate, or the convicted prisoner. In other words, many prisoners find jobs that involve labor, but when the need for that labor is at a low or not even needed at that time they often fall victim to layoffs. Thus restarting the cycle of finding someone who will hire a convicted prisoner.

The next challenge many newly released prisoners will face is the issue of just what family will be there to provide some sort of assistance that loud allow them a smooth transition back into the community. Unfortunately many re-entered prisoner’s families cut off most, if not all ties that link them to the re-entered.This is where most barriers are formed due to the fact prisoners rely heavily on their families for housing and support immediately after their release. If a prisoner has nothing upon release or has no family/friend willing to take them in, then chances they will return back to prison within the next couple of month’s increases dramatically. This isn’t because they are incapable of being a productive member in society, but ether they don’t have the means or financial resources to actually get back up on their feet.In the same study done in Cleveland, researchers found that while 25 percent of released prisoners received financial support from a spouse, family member, or friend before being locked away, 66 percent reported receiving support from a spouse, family member, or friend in the first month after release. Why is this important? It shows a direct correlation between support and staying out of prison upon re-entry. 26 percent of released prisoners in Cleveland cited “support from family’ as the most important factor in staying out of prison.

Many if not all prisoners stated that without that support the chances of them returning to prison was extremely likely. Interestingly enough the study also presented a unique stats. It found that men who returned from prison to live with their wives and children fared much better than those who either lived alone or returned to live with a parent. Following release, prisoners in Cleveland also stated they were more likely to live with a parent or sibling than they Were prior to being locked up, and less likely to live with a spouse or partner than they were prior to enticing.While receiving support from whomever is a crucial step for the released prisoner it is important to know that they are not the only ones who are affected.

While the spouse or family member might be able to get over the set back a prisoner faced, the most vulnerable person in this situation is the child. The loss of a parent at the time of incarceration is a traumatic event for a child. Children often experience a major change in their living arrangements after a parent’s incarceration.These changes are most noticed when the mother of the child is locked up. More times than not however corruption of the family home environment is likely to occur in all cases of parental incarceration, regardless if it was your mother or father.

The challenges the children face often revolve around losing a substantial amount of financial support. Also another major problem is after the parent returns home, reestablishing disrupted parent-child relationships. All these studies and reports revolve around one common idea.It all suggests that families are an important influence in the reentry process and that they provide much- needed support to returning prisoners.

The final barrier that many prisoners eave to face regardless of family support, or financial stability is resisting temptation to go right back to what got you locked up in the first place. They get out, they have little training or education, they can’t get jobs and, in many cases, return to lives of crime and find themselves back behind bars. This is a key feature of recidivism, which is the tendency to relapse into a previous undesirable type of behavior.

If a prisoner does not acknowledge what lead them to prison, and continues to display the same behaviors, then all the other foundations (family support, financial stability) are meaningless cause they will end up right where they started. It is known that prison is a revolving door for many released individuals. There have been many studies that support this claim, including two recidivism studies done by the Bureau of Justice statistics back in 1 983, and in 1994. They found that that approximately two-thirds of those released (62. 5 percent for the 1 983 study and 67. Percent for the 1994 study) were subsequently rearrested within three years of release. While these studies and stats may seem out dated, the information being presented hasn’t changed very much and still holds true in 015.

The Revolving Door theory, states if a prisoner is released their chances returning back to prison is very high. The real question is how officials keep the ones they released out of prison. If you were to ask 1 00 CRY corrections staff “how do you close the revolving door? ” you would likely receive 100 different opinions.It’s an issue for correction researchers, and a barrier for prisoners.

A popular opinion in reducing recidivism rates is offer more educational programs behind bars. As this causes tax payers to pay more money, it also gives the released individual a chance when he/she is anally set free. Inmates who receive correctional education behind bars are not just significantly less likely to return to prison; they are also more likely to find jobs after being released. Participants in academic or vocational education programs had a 13% better chance of finding employment than those who did not.

Many corporation including R. A. N. D look to aid and reeducate prisoners behind bars so they are not caught off guard upon release. In a study conducted by R. A. N. D they found that inmates who participated in correctional education programs (i.

E. Remedial education to evolve reading and math skills, GEED preparation, postsecondary education or vocational training) were 43% less likely to return to prison within three years of release in comparison to those who did not participate. On that stats alone you can see the importance of re-education for prisoners.

Another idea presented by researchers was offer many more vocational training programs. These not your ordinary jobs that many people go to school for. Vocational training programs are generally linked to specific job skills, including welding, computing culinary arts, construction trades and auto mechanics. Inmates an benefit from these training programs for two reasons. One, it sets them apart from other non-incarcerated individuals because they possess information regarding specific job skills.

Secondly vocational programs present some hope for the locked up individual that they will be able to find work on the outside due to their new knowledge and ultimately stay out of prison once they are released. The only issue with vocational training as stated by education administrators is whether the cost of providing such programs are worth the gains in lower recidivism.

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