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Self-fulfilling prophecies occur more often than you’d think. In this lesson, we discuss this phenomenon and explain how it’s due to a cognitive error. We also go over some classic studies as well as real-life examples.

Self-Fulfilling Prophecies

Have you ever woken up and just knew it was going to be a bad day? Sure enough, you stub your toe, people at work seem to be in a bad mood, and negative things just seem to happen. If so, you were likely experiencing a self-fulfilling prophecy.

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A self-fulfilling prophecy is when a person unknowingly causes a prediction to come true, due to the simple fact that he or she expects it to come true.In other words, an expectation about a subject, such as a person or event, can affect our behavior towards that subject, which causes the expectation to be realized. For example, a high school volleyball coach expects freshmen to be less skilled, so she does not put them in to play very often. When she does put them in, they are rusty and don’t do well, thereby fulfilling her expectations.In one study regarding self-fulfilling prophecies, psychologists led some male college students to believe that a female student was attracted to them and others to believe that she was not attracted to them. The social psychologists later observed interactions between the men and the female in question.

The woman was much more likely to act as if she was attracted to the first set of men. Why? Because the men who thought she was attracted to them acted in a way that seemed to lead her to actually be attracted to them.You can think of the self-fulfilling prophecy as a circular pattern.

Our actions toward others impact their beliefs about us, which dictates their actions towards us, which then reinforces our beliefs about ourselves. This, in turn, influences our actions towards others, which brings us back to the beginning of the cycle. This pattern can be negative, like the freshmen volleyball players example, but it can also be positive.

The Pygmalion Effect

One classic study conducted in the late 1960s demonstrates the power of a positive self-fulfilling prophecy, also known as the Pygmalion effect. Robert Rosenthal informed the teachers in one elementary school that five of the students in their class had been identified as ‘academic spurters,’ who would likely outperform their classmates during the remainder of the year. The teachers were told (falsely) that this had been determined by testing done earlier that year.In reality, these five students were chosen completely at random, so there should have been no difference in the increase in their academic performance relative to the other students. However, by the end of the year, those five did outperform the other students.

The teachers’ expectations for the ‘academic spurters’ caused them to treat those students differently, providing better and more feedback, asking them more questions, etc. This resulted in better academic performance, thus fulfilling the prophecy of academic excellence that was made.

Cognitive Error

When we experience a self-fulfilling prophecy, we are experiencing a cognitive error, which is when our mind convinces us of something that isn’t actually true. One type of cognitive error is when we jump to a false conclusion. For example, sometimes we assume the guy who cut in front of traffic did so because he’s a jerk; in reality, it could have been for a good reason.

Likewise, sometimes we assume that we didn’t get the job because the potential employer didn’t like us; in reality, it could have been because the job was already promised to an existing employee.So, a self-fulfilling prophecy is a cognitive error because we assume that something will happen, and when it does, we assume we were right. However, we don’t attribute the result to our behavior, which is what actually caused that something to happen.

Lesson Summary

In summary, a self-fulfilling prophecy is when a person unknowingly causes a prediction to come true, due to the simple fact that he or she expects it to come true. In other words, an expectation about a subject can affect our behavior toward that subject, which causes the expectation to be realized. The self-fulfilling prophecy cycle is usually considered negative, but it can also be positive.

When it is, it’s known as the Pygmalion effect.When we experience a self-fulfilling prophecy, we are also experiencing a cognitive error, which is when our mind convinces us of something that isn’t actually true. We assume that something will happen, and when it does, we assume we were right. However, we don’t attribute the result to our behavior, which is what actually caused that something to happen.

Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this lesson, you’ll have the ability to:

  • Explain how a self-fulfilling prophecy occurs
  • Provide negative and positive examples of self-fulfilling prophecies
  • Define Pygmalion effect
  • Describe how a self-fulfilling prophecy is a cognitive error

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