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The plants are light green in color and have multiple small, plump leaves with pinnate venation that are whorled. Acidic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants appear to be stunted in height. However, they still retain supple and springy stems covered in trochee and are light green. Basic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants seem to be stunted in eight. They still retain supple and springy stems covered in trochee and are light green. Day 2 Controlled Soil Plants (A and B): The plants have grown significantly in height.

They have bigger leaves attached to the stem by petioles, which appear to be thicker and stronger than previously observed in Day 1 . The white, fuzzy trochee covering the stems are more prominent. The plants appear healthy and have a light green color. Acidic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants appear to be slightly wilted. The stems are slightly limp and curves downwards; they do not provide support. The plants have not retained their light green color, but have slightly yellowed. The leaves appear to be generally unaffected; however, some of the smaller leaves are limp to the touch.

The plants have lost height significantly and appear to be extremely stunted. Basic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants appear to be slightly wilted. The stems are slightly limp and curve downwards and thus are unable to support the plants well. The plants have lost their initial color and appear paler. The leaves have remained healthy and are not wilted. Plant A has grown slightly; however, Plant B has drastically reduced in height and appears stunted. Controlled Soil Plants (A and B): The plants have not grown significantly in height.

However, they appear to be healthy; the stems are longer and are covered in white trochee that are more prominent. In addition, they have retained their suppleness. In addition, the leaves have grown bigger and have thicker veins. Several lateral buds have grown on the stem. Acidic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants appear to be wilted, and more significantly than on Day 2. The stems are limp and have lost most of its fuzzy white trochee. The leaves are wilted and shriveled. Plant A has grown, but it is insignificant. In contrast, Plant B has grown significantly, although it appears to be limp.

Basic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants appear to be pale and are slightly limp. The leaves are generally unaffected- only the smaller leaves have completely wilted. The stems are slightly wilted and have lost some of its trochee. There are no signs of leaf growth. However, Plant A and B have both grown significantly in height. Day 4 Controlled Soil Plants (A and B): The plants appear to be healthy. The stems have grown longer and are covered in trochee that thin along the top of the stem. The leaves have grown slightly, as well as the petioles, which are firmer and longer.

As these plants were not exposed to harsh acidic or basic environments, they were able to grow without interference. These plants thus represent plants that are unaffected by acid rain (or basic conditions). Acidic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants are significantly stunted compared to its initial appearance in Day 1 . The stems are completely wilted and are unable to support the plant at all. The leaves are wilted as well, and the plants have not retained its initial light green color; it is a dark green/grey. As these plants were exposed to acidic soil conditions, they were unable to grow properly.

Thus, these plants represent plants that are exposed to acid rain. Basic Soil Plants (A and B): The plants are wilted, although the stems are still able to somewhat support the plants. The leaves are slightly limp and yellowish in color. However, Plant A still grew slightly, while Plant B was reduced in height. Although these plants were exposed to basic soil conditions, their growth was somewhat stunted. These plants represent plants that are exposed to liming, a natural phenomenon in which mime, a basic chemical compound, dissolves in water and makes soil basic.

Conclusion In the time period of four days, the effect of varying pH levels (2. 35, 4. 0, 7. 25, 10, and 7) on the growth of radish plants were examined. In basic and acidic conditions, the radish plants grew stunted in height and withered. All of the radish plants affected by the basic and acidic buffer solutions had limp stems and leaves that were unable to function properly. However, the radish plants kept at a pH of 7 appeared healthy and functioned efficiently, as they grew faster than the former.

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