Site Loader
Rock Street, San Francisco

This amount of thermal energy is called the Latent Heat of Fusion of water. Background Just as steam has a higher internal energy than water, so water has a higher internal energy content than ice. When ice melts into water, it absorbs thermal energy from its surroundings, but does not change temperature. The absorbed energy enables water molecules in the crystalline form of ice to break free of the bonds that hold them together. The phase change from solid to liquid involves a transfer of thermal energy into the substance, but doesn’t involve a temperature change for the substance.

The thermal energy, AS, depends on the mass, m, and the latent heat of fusion, HP (the amount of energy per gram needed to change hash at a specific temperature). !Shape change = miff If the substance changes from solid to liquid, and then the liquid undergoes a temperature change, the total amount of thermal energy involved is the sum of the thermal energy for the phase change and the thermal energy for the temperature change. !Quota = ! Shape change + ! Quaternary change = miff + Mac!

T The thermal energy comes from the environment that surrounds the substance. Preview Use a Fast-Response Temperature Probe to measure the change in temperature of a known mass of water as ice changes from solid to liquid in the water. Use the Explorer GEL to record and display the temperature. Determine the latent heat of fusion of the ice. Physics with the Explorer GEL 0 2006 PASO p. 235 ACtiVity 33 Safety Precaution Follow all directions for using the equipment. Wear protective gear (such as gloves, goggles, and lab coat. ) Procedure GEL Setup 1.

Plug a Fast-Response Temperature Probe into the first temperature port on the left side of the Explorer GEL and then turn on the GEL ( The Graph screen shows Temperature (co) and Time (s). Measure and record the mass of a calorimeter from the PASO Basic Calorimeter Set. Fill the calorimeter approximately half-full of warm water (about 15 co above room temperature). Measure and record the mass of the calorimeter plus water. Put the end of the Temperature Probe into the water. Get ready to add chunks of ice to the warm water. Equipment Setup 1. . 3. 4. 5. Fig. 1: GEL graph Record Data 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Press Start () on the GEL to measure the signal from the Temperature Probe. The temperature appears in the graph display. Make a note of the initial temperature of the water. Wipe off any excess water on several small chunks of ice and immediately add them to the warm water in the calorimeter. Gently wire the water in the calorimeter. Carefully watch the temperature in the Graph screen. As the ice melts, dry more chunks and add them to the water, swirling the water continuously.

When the water temperature gets as far below room temperature as it was initially above room temperature, and all the ice in the water is melted, stop adding ice. Press to stop data recording. Remove the Temperature Probe and then immediately measure and record the mass of the calorimeter plus water plus melted ice. Clean up the equipment as instructed. P. 236 Analysis 1 . 2. Use the graph of temperature versus time to find the initial temperature of he water and the equilibrium temperature, or final temperature, of the water and the melted ice. Press IF ( ) to open the ‘Tools’ menu.

Select ‘Smart Tool’. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the part of the graph that shows the initial temperature of the water. Record the value. Repeat the process to find the final temperature (equilibrium temperature) of the water and the melted ice. Use your measurements of the mass of the calorimeter, the calorimeter plus water, and the calorimeter plus water plus ice to determine the mass of the water and the mass of the ice. Use the mass of the water, the mass of the ice, and the initial and IANAL temperatures of the water to calculate the heat of fusion of water.

The ice starts at 0 co, melts into water, and then warms up to the same final temperature as the water. The thermal energy transferred to the ice as it changed to water and then warmed up is the same as the thermal energy transferred from the initially warm water as it cooled down from its initial temperature to the final, cooler temperature. In other words, the sum of the latent heat of fusion, Shapes change plus the thermal energy for changing the temperature of the melted ice, Quaternaries change, is the same as the herbal energy for changing the temperature of the warm water. Hash change + ! Quaternary change = ! Swatter mice HP + mice 4186] / KC Tiffin ” CO = matter 4186] / KC Tindal ” Tiffin mice HP + mice cater ! Testes matter cater ! Atwater The first task is to solve for HP, the latent heat effusion. Then, substitute values for the mass of the ice, the mass of the water, the initial temperature of the water, and the final temperature of the water. Record your results and answer the questions in the Lab Report. P. 237 Physics with the Explorer GIG-X @ 2006 PASO p. 238 Lab Report – Activity 33: Latent Heat of Fusion Name

Data Sketch your graph of temperature versus time. Include labels and units on the axes. (See Sample Data. ) Data Table Item Mass of calorimeter Mass of calorimeter plus water Mass of water, matter Mass of calorimeter plus water plus melted ice Mass of ice, mice Initial Temperature of Water, Tindal Final Temperature of Water, Tiffin Value keg keg keg keg keg coco Calculations Calculate the mass of the water, matter, where the mass of the water is the mass of the calorimeter plus water minus the mass of the calorimeter.

Calculate the mass of the ice, mice, where the mass of the ice is the mass of the calorimeter lulus water plus melted ice (the final mass) minus the mass of the calorimeter plus water Use the mass of the water, mass of the ice, specific heat of water (cater is 4186 J/KC), initial temperature of the water, and final temperature of the water to calculate the latent heat of fusion. P. 39 mice HP + mice 4186] / KC Tiffin ” CO = matter JUJU / KC Tindal ” Tiffin mice HP + mice cater ! Twice = matter cater ! Atwater First, solve the final equation for HP, the latent heat of fusion. Next, substitute your values for mass of water, matter, mass of ice, mice, initial temperature, Tindal, and final temperature, Tiffin. Finally, calculate the results. The units for the latent heat of fusion are joules per kilogram, or J/keg.

Post Author: admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *